The Tiny Soldier, part 7 (Flash Fiction chain #5)

flash fiction monkey

This is part 7 of  flash fiction chain #5 hosted by photrablogger and inspired by the amazing picture above.  First time doing this, please be nice and kind.
To get the context of the story, please read the first five parts
Part 1by Abirami
Part 2 by Sona
Part 3 by Yinglan
Part 4 by Dr. KO
Part 5 by Austin

Part 6 by Phaena

Character List:
Rick-10yrs Old
Jenna-Rick’s Social Worker
Mrs. Montgomery
Jake- Mrs. Montgomery’s son
Sun- The Monkey
***Elaborated Characters*** (The Other
Kids Sorted By Tables)
Table 1-
Mesa-Boy, 14 yrs old
Toro-Boy, 12 yrs old
Wheeze-Boy, 8 yrs old
Table 2-
Danus-Boy, 11 yrs old
Makaya & Kumba-Boys, Twins, 7 yrs old
Table 3-
Marilyn-Girl, 11 yrs old
Britney-Girl, 8 yrs old
Kanya-Girl, 6 yrs old

 

Mesa put a finger to his lips, gesturing a hush to Toro. They had followed the trail of eggs and food parts, and now they could hear voices ahead. The bush was thicker here, overbearing, and both boys were anxious to see what lay ahead. They turned a corner and saw the backs of Moses, Rick and Danus. All three were silent, staring up at a figure in a tree. The sunlight was struggling to break the canopy above, and visibility was poor.

Mesa looked at Toro and they exchanged shrugs.

Rick was the first to move, yelling “I don’t understand… What do you mean I will?”

Moses and Danus turned to stare at Rick.

Mesa, wiping food from his hair, disturbed a branch and a snap echoed across the clearing. The three boys turned to look for the source of the sound. It was then that Toro saw the eyes in the tree above. They were red, almost glowing, scowling and conveying messages that Toro couldn’t fathom. He was gripped, by fear and by fascination.

Someone shouted run, and soon the eyes in the tree had vanished, along with the three boys. Mesa was about to give chase when Toro grabbed his arm.

“I know those eyes,” he said.

“What eyes,” said Mesa, clearly oblivious to what Toro had seen.

“Years ago, on the street, I heard about it. All the vagrant kids told stories about it. They said it was a monkey, and only its victims could see it. They called it Sunne and said it tricks children into doing its bidding, bewitching them into its army. They harvest souls for their master, so that it might live forever.

“I had a friend, Jonah, who believed he saw his father returning to take him away from the streets. We were all so jealous, thinking that one of us was going to escape the street life. But that night, when we returned to our shelter down by the river, we saw Jonah there, but he was different. He looked into my eyes and I saw it – the evil. Seeing that… it’s the reason I found my way off the street. I’ve been trying to forget it, ever since I saw it. Please, Mesa… don’t follow it,” said Toro.

Mesa stared at the ground, his lips twisting and brow furrowed in deep thought.

“I’m sorry, but if this thing is a danger, we must stop it before it does something to Rick,” said Mesa.

Toro’s heart sank. He knew Mesa was too kind, too weak. Toro had lived a life no child should ever face, and knew the importance of thinking only for yourself. He wished so painfully that his friend could be the same.

“My greatest friend, I have no choice but to follow Rick and the boys. I will do it, with or without you,” he said.

“Then if that is your choice, I am sorry but you must go alone. I cannot take that risk. Who are we to face something like this?” he asked.

“If this is how it must be…” said Mesa, letting the words hang as he turned to follow the boys.

Toro slumped against the tree. He had lost so many friends over the years, the harshness of existence no stranger to him. Mesa was his first true friend in a long time. How could he let this friend march on to his death?

“Wait,” cried Toro. “I can’t let you go alone. If we are going after Sunne, we need to make sure we have a plan,” he said, sprinting after Mesa.

“If we can trick it by manipulating what it thinks is out deepest desire, we might be able to defeat it” he called as he gained on Mesa.

*******

Jenna took her time pacing again around the Post Office, this time looking even harder, checking the silly places we always look the second time around; under chairs, behind baskets. Had she missed her? There was absolutely no sign of ma. She asked the clerk at the counter, but he was adamant he hadn’t seen her all day.

Jenna went back to her car and sat there staring at her steering wheel. Where was ma? Why had she lied about going to the post office? Had the kids lied about her whereabouts?

She felt her gut twinge, some primal instinct sounding a warning. Without wasting another moment, Jenna made the decision to return to the house. She sped all the way, worried about the mysterious happenings, and feeling overcome with concern at leaving those children unattended.

As she pulled up outside the house, she twisted out of her seatbelt and ran up the front path. She called around the house, but nobody answered. She checked the garden, the kitchen, the bedrooms… nobody. She cried out, again and again. Her heartbeat was a drumroll, so intense she could taste the iron of her blood in her throat. Her eyes were hurting with fear. Why did she leave them?

She stepped into the dining room, the detritus from the morning’s fight still evident. There, amongst the eggs and biscuits she saw it; a half-eaten banana.

She took out her phone and called a number on speed-dial.

The phone answered with a click. It was a man’s voice on the other end.

“Jack, it’s happening.”

 

Up next, part 8 by Priceless Joy

Part 9 by Rashmi

Part 10 by Manvi

Part 11 by Sweety

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